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15/03/2015

Samsung R540 Battery earbattery.co.uk

It’s difficult to do the screen justice in a few paragraphs, and the extra size makes me wonder how I coped with just a 12″ XGA screen beforehand.Talking about the wireless button — one thing I like about this model is that there is no irritating blue LED’s on the notebook which distract the user (like on some HP’s and Toshibas). Everything is just nice green lights. All the status lights are in a neat row below the hinge of the monitor — and they are all nice looking icons with the light shining through them. Also, application specific buttons are a nice matte silver, none of that tacky looking chrome buttons found on some machines.Overall I am quite impressed by the looks and build of this notebook — while it doesn’t have that “I can take anything you throw at me” look, it is quite well built and pretty sharp looking when on your desk.

As with most laptops the speakers are unlikely to replace your home hi-fi anytime soon, but the inbuilt 2.1 speakers are much better than you usually find in laptops and are more than up to the job of watching movies or listening to the occasional song, and with 7.1 surround output you can always hook it up to other speakers. The volume control feels a bit cheap though.The dual core processor and 1GB ram mean that XP, Ubuntu & Vista are all very fast and very responsive on this laptop, and there is a huge difference in comparison to single core systems. The biggest gain however is the ability to run a resource hogging program but still have a responsive system, and as applications become smarter and are able to take advantage of the dual core architecture and more run processes more intelligently in the background things can only get better. The ATI Mobility X1800 graphics card also means that the latest software and games run great, although the Core is under clocked to 400MHz (from 450MHz on the ATI Specifications) presumably for heat reasons, it is definitely not a slow graphics card. Doom, UT2004 & C&C Generals all run at high quality brilliantly. And the 3DMark result shows just how able this graphics card is, and is unbeatable for the price. The biggest bottleneck in the system is the hard disk and while all the other components are high end the hard disk is pretty average — an upgrade to a 7,200rpm hard disk, or adding another disk in RAID0 would make a noticeable difference. The included disk isn’t slow, it’s just average which stands out in a system of otherwise top-end components.

Fujitsu might be better known in the professional world for its wide range of convertible notebook tablet PCs, but the Lifebook family isn’t going to be left out of Intel’s Ultrabook craze. Fujitsu announced several Ultrabooks for 2012 and the Lifebook U772 is a sleek-looking Ultrabook designed with business professionals in mind.The first thing I noticed about the Lifebook U772 was its elegant design; it has an understated look with smooth, clean lines. I like the contrasting black and silver colors. There is not a hint of glossy plastic on this Ultrabook (save for the glossy display surface, of course) which is greatly appreciated. The attention to detail is impressive; there are no unfinished edges and all the parts fit together smoothly. As a matter of fact the keyboard and surrounding areas are one solid piece; it’s certainly not inexpensive to produce that part.

The chassis has a solid feel thanks to its metal construction; it’s hard to flex the chassis and no ripples appear on the screen when it’s pushed in on from behind. The chassis is impressively thin at less than 0.7 inches and for a 14-inch notebook is positively a featherweight at 3.15 pounds.The U772 has an above average number of ports for an Ultrabook including three USB and an HDMI port. It has Ethernet via an included dongle since the height of an Ethernet port is actually greater than the thickness of this Ultrabook. There is no VGA port. The only thing you’ll find on the front edge are status lights and there is nothing but a screen hinge on the rear side of the U772.Left: AC power jack, cooling exhaust vent, Kensington lock slot, USB 2.0, headphone/microphone combination jack

Right: SD card reader, 2x USB 3.0, HDMI, Ethernet (connects via included dongle)

The U772’s full-size keyboard is the problem with this notebook. Its exceptionally short key travel (a few millimeters at best) means an almost total lack of tactile feedback; it’s hard to tell when a key is pressed down. The F and J keys do not have enough of a raised bump to place hands in the correct positions by feel. Additionally I had issues with the space bar; I tap it with my right thumb and it did not register half the time. Last but not least there are layout issues; the Home and End keys are secondary functions in the arrow key cluster. Programmers especially will miss having these as dedicated keys.The Synaptics touchpad is a nightmare with factory settings. It has a ‘feature’ where the cursor continuously moves across the surface even after lifting your finger off it; it’s called ‘Momentum’. Once disabled the touchpad functioned normally. Once that’s done the touchpad is actually quite nice. It has a smooth surface and is accurate enough. This is a clickpad; press down anywhere to produce a click. Clicks are audible but not annoyingly loud.

The U772 is available with an anti-glare screen surface but ours has the glossy one. This is unfortunate because there are too many reflections in well-lit environments. This 14-inch display has a disappointing 1366×768 resolution; as a business-oriented Ultrabook, it should have a higher 1600×900 resolution (which has approx. one-third more space). A higher resolution is unfortunately not available. There is simply not enough room to use two windows side-by-side with this resolution. The display itself is of low quality; there is a lack of saturation as colors look washed out and the viewing angles are poor; even a slight tilting of the display results in colors inverting. Brightness is good however. Normally I would be forgiving about the display quality but this Ultrabook is priced at north of $1,500; it should have something better. This same quality display can be found on a $400 bargain basement notebook.

The TN121R has a great keyboard and I was impressed. It is better than some HP and Fujitsu tablet notebook models I have reviewed. The keyboard is solid and has no flex. The keys are easy to push and give the perfect amount of feedback. The only problem with the keyboard is it is small and the keys are the size of my fingertips, so if you have bigger hands you might have some typos. For as much space as there is inside, I would think the keyboard wouldn’t be as cramped.The touchpad is your basic touchpad. Nothing fancy, it is indented into the palm rest so your finger doesn’t lose its place and it is accurate like a mouse. The right and left click buttons have a chrome finish, which is another fingerprint magnet, but they work as expected. Just like the keyboard though the touchpad buttons are a little small.

The included pen used for the tablet touchscreen interface is a solid piece of plastic that I could only use for a few hours of work. If you plan on taking notes or writing a lot, I recommend getting another pen. The Clevo pen is small and just like the stylus from a Palm Treo. There is no eraser, no buttons or anything. It’s a very basic pen, but it does work for navigating and is responsive with the screen.The TN121R didn’t get hot. In fact it barely got warm. This tablet ran at a normal temperature even when running the benchmarks and multiple applications. The left side by the fan got a little warm, but that is expected. I was never uncomfortable typing on it or holding it in tablet mode.

The U772 has one tiny speaker that is oddly placed under the left side of the palm rest and is curiously aimed left too. It sounds awful even for voice-only applications like a Skype call. I won’t dock too many points for this oversight – this is an Ultrabook, after all – but this is the worst-sounding sound setup of all the Ultrabooks I’ve tested.The U772 is available with an anti-glare screen surface but ours has the glossy one. This is unfortunate because there are too many reflections in well-lit environments. This 14-inch display has a disappointing 1366×768 resolution; as a business-oriented Ultrabook, it should have a higher 1600×900 resolution (which has approx. one-third more space). A higher resolution is unfortunately not available. There is simply not enough room to use two windows side-by-side with this resolution. The display itself is of low quality; there is a lack of saturation as colors look washed out and the viewing angles are poor; even a slight tilting of the display results in colors inverting. Brightness is good however. Normally I would be forgiving about the display quality but this Ultrabook is priced at north of $1,500; it should have something better. This same quality display can be found on a $400 bargain basement notebook.

The U772 has one tiny speaker that is oddly placed under the left side of the palm rest and is curiously aimed left too. It sounds awful even for voice-only applications like a Skype call. I won’t dock too many points for this oversight – this is an Ultrabook, after all – but this is the worst-sounding sound setup of all the Ultrabooks I’ve tested.The U772 is clearly on the high side of Ultrabook pricing; it starts at higher than what most Ultrabooks sell for. That said it has some impressive specifications; the Intel Core i7-3667U (a $150 option) is the fastest dual-core processor available in an Ultrabook and the included 128GB Micron C400 Solid State Drive ($230 option) is blazing fast. Everything else on our review unit is standard. The base customizable U772 is equipped with a 320GB hard drive and an i5-3427U dual-core processor. I think the SSD is almost certainly worth the upgrade (no noise, less power consumption and eons better performance vs. a hard drive) though the i5 processor is more than sufficient; chances are the i7’s extra power will go unnoticed and $150 is a lot of money for such a moderate increase in performance.

The U772 packs some business friendly functionality I have not seen on many Ultrabooks, namely Intel vPro remote management technology and a fingerprint reader. Also note the U772 comes standard with Windows 7 Professional; Home Premium isn’t even an option. Lastly I’ll point out the standard Bluetooth and better-than-average Intel Centrino Advanced-N 6205 wireless card.There’s a single cooling exhaust vent on the left side of the notebook. The good news is that most of the time it stays off; this notebook produces little heat except when watching HD video. The fan gets rather noisy when it turns on however; it has a slight whine and can be heard across a medium size room. The left side of the notebook around the fan gets not quite hot but close to it. I can’t say I’m impressed with the U772’s thermal management.

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