Blogs Lalibre.be
Lalibre.be | Créer un Blog | Avertir le modérateur

04/04/2017

ASUS X71Vn Battery

Lenovo has also unveiled two counterparts running Windows 8, the ThinkPad Yoga 11e and the ThinkPad 11e.The touchscreen convertible Chromebook can switch between the four different "modes" seen elsewhere in Lenovo's Yoga series, as well as rugged features.As well as the standard laptop and tablet modes, users can also fold back the Chromebook's screen or stand it on its edges due to the flexible hinge.Lenovo hasn't revealed full specs, but all four devices will come with an 11.6in screen, rubber bumpers, reinforced ports and hardier hinges to prevent damage. The convertible Chromebook also features an HD LED display. Promised battery life for the Chromebook is eight hours, according to Lenovo.There's no word on UK pricing or availability yet, but the two Chromebooks will start from $349, while the Windows devices will start from $449.Let’s begin with three simple facts. First, if your business reflects the norm, then it’s more and more likely that your employees rely on laptops for everyday computing tasks. According to figures from IDC, mobile PCs are expected to account for 70% of all PCs sold by the end of 2012.

Second, laptops go missing at an alarming rate. Recent studies from research organisation The Ponemon Institute found that 275 European organisations had lost over 72,000 laptops during 2010. A separate UK study found that 86% of IT professionals knew of someone in their organisation who had either lost a laptop or had one stolen.Third, when a laptop gets lost or stolen, the physical cost is only a small portion of the financial impact. According to 2009 research from Intel, when you take lost productivity, data breaches and legal, regulatory and consulting expenses into account, a single lost laptop can cost a company an average of 35,000 Euros, or £31,000.Put these three facts together, and you have the stuff of an IT administrator’s nightmare.Laptop security poses a challenge for even the most security-conscious professional, for the simple reason that they’re not always on company premises, under company control. As business owners or IT managers, laptops leave us at the mercy of end users.In 2009, an employee of Nationwide left a laptop at home containing private details for nearly 11 million customersIn 2009, an employee of Nationwide left a laptop at home containing private details for nearly 11 million customers

For example, in 2009 an employee of Nationwide left a laptop at home containing private details for nearly 11 million customers, including names, addresses and account details. When the laptop was stolen he informed his employer of the loss, but not of the information on it. It was only three weeks later, after he returned from holiday, that the bank discovered the extent of the security breach.In August 2010, a laptop containing unencrypted customer information was stolen from a Bristol branch of the Chelsea Building Society, where an employee had left in a bag under a desk overnight. To compound matters, the bag included a note of the relevant passwords. You can guess what happened next.What’s more, end-users will have accidents. A 2010 survey by IDC found that, each year, up to 20% of laptops used by enterprises required repair, with 14.2% of those repairs stemming from accidental damage. IDC estimated that these repairs cost British businesses in excess of £2 billion per year.In order to install Ubuntu, you'll need to put your Chromebook into developer mode and use the command line to download the installation files. This tutorial will show you how.

The first task is to put your Chromebook into developer mode, which in most cases is achieved by flicking a physical switch. Depending on the model of your Chromebook, you may need to change a BIOS setting, too, as we describe in the main text.The first task is to put your Chromebook into developer mode, which in most cases is achieved by flicking a physical switch. To ensure no-one can tamper with your Chromebook without your knowledge, this warning screen appears every time your system starts up in developer mode. Press Ctrl-D to dismiss it and carry on booting – or wait 30 seconds for it to disappear.To ensure no-one can tamper with your Chromebook without your knowledge, this warning screen appears every time your system s Entering developer mode wipes your settings, so you’ll be invited to set up Chrome OS as if from scratch. Use this dialog to connect to a wireless network, but don’t log in – press Ctrl-Alt-Forward Arrow to switch to the command line.Entering developer mode wipes your settings, so you’ll be invited to set up Chrome OS as if from scratch. Use this dialog to The default user name is “chronos”, and the command to download ChrUbuntu is “wget http://goo.gl/tnyga”. You can launch the script with “sudo bash tnyga”. You’ll need to run this twice: once to partition your disk, then again to install Ubuntu.

The default user name is “chronos”, and the command to download ChrUbuntu is “wget http://goo.gl/tnyga”. You can launch the s Ubuntu runs perfectly happily on x86 Chromebook hardware – from the operating system’s point of view, it’s just a regular laptop. You may want to reconfigure some keyboard settings, though, since Chromebooks don’t have a Windows key.Ubuntu runs perfectly happily on x86 Chromebook hardware – from the operating system’s point of view, it’s just a regular lap If you want to update your Chromebook to Ubuntu 12.10, simply change one setting in the update manager: by default only LTS releases are offered, but the latest OS will become available if you change this to “any new version”.Stuart Turton, bring that maniacally-follicled, weirdly shaped head over here so I can slap you round the back of it for praising Windows 8.

I’ve just watched Microsoft’s Windows 8 reveal and it’s clear that Messrs Sinofsky, Ballmer et al have not so much jumped the shark as chucked the whole company into the aquarium.Let’s start with the quite bad news before moving onto the really dismaying stuff. From this (admittedly early) video, the heart of Windows 8 looks much like Windows 7. Once Jensen gets over the exciting slidey touchscreen features of Windows 8, the same Start menu and Windows furniture is lurking beneath. Skip to three minutes through the video - that’s Windows 7, and it looks exactly the same as the operating system I’d be running right now if I didn’t like OS X more.This consistency is broadly good news for PCs. Windows 7 is a great operating system and doesn’t need too much tinkering. The bad news is that with a full-blown desktop operating system at its heart, Windows 8 is still going to need decent hardware.Windows 8 can be a desktop and laptop operating system, or it can be an operating system for tablets - it cannot be bothIt’s an assumption to say that Windows 8 on a tablet will be a chuntery, grinding experience, but I’m going to say it anyway. A full-blown desktop operating system like Windows requires too much power to run properly on an ultraportable, low-power processor, which is why Apple only brought the barest bones of OS X to the iOS platform, and why any tablet PC running a full version of Windows 7 is absolutely doomed.

I remember watching Ballmer announce a sensationally boring set of tablets at CES in January and thumping my head against the desk, along with everyone else who’d ever tried to use a Windows 7 tablet. Windows 8 can be a desktop and laptop operating system, or it can be an operating system for tablets. It cannot be both.Stuart’s right about Microsoft and touch when he says Microsoft hasn’t cracked it, but he’s wrong about why the company has struggled. Microsoft’s problem isn’t that it cannot design a touch UI; it’s done a great job with Windows Phone 7. The company’s problem has been trying to shoehorn touchscreen devices into markets that don’t need or want them.Like a showhorse with a handgun, a touch interface on a desktop makes no sense. Once you’re sitting in front of a computer with a keyboard and mouse, the screen’s either too far away or at too oblique an angle to be reasonably used as a touchscreen, and why Microsoft thinks everyone wants to get fingerprints all over their desktop screens is so beyond me it’s in danger of colliding with the International Space Station.A desktop operating system that integrates a huge swathe of touchscreen features is a waste of time, and before you argue with that, how many times have you used Windows 7’s touch features, or even been tempted to buy the hardware to use them?

Let’s head for Stuart’s main contention, though, which is that Apple is too big a threat for Windows 8 to be awful. I don’t disagree that Microsoft can ill-afford to have a Vista-style misfire with Windows 8. But Windows 8 already looks awful, and the person who decided that a loud, purple/orange/vomit colour scheme would make a good first impression needs to visit the opticians.Second, remember Vista? When it came out, Microsoft was feeling the squeeze from a resurgent Apple, XP was well and truly on its last legs, and Microsoft badly needed to pull something great out of the bag. The result? An operating system that cost the better part of $6 billion to develop, gave a sensational first impression, and then spent the next five years annoying users until they gazed wistfully at their XP disks and reinstalled that. The idea that Microsoft will respond well to the threat of Apple is unproven at best; the only exception I can think of where the company has truly risen to a challenge set to it is Windows Phone 7, and that arrived no fewer than three years after Apple set the bar. As for its decision to spend $8.5 billion on Skype? All I can say is that the money could have been better spent on splitting Windows into two streams, one for traditional computing and one for touchscreen devices.

At the end of Microsoft’s teaser video, Harris says: “This is the new version of Windows. It’s going to run on laptops, it’s going to run on desktops, it’s going to run on PCs with mouse and keyboard, it’s going to run on touch slates: it’s going to run on everything.” All well and good, but the danger - if not the flat-out likelihood - is that if Microsoft designs Windows 8 to run on everything, it may not run well on anything.The makers of the Raspberry Pi have revealed that they're working on an embedded version of the £30 computer for commercial products and businesses.While the Raspberry Pi is predominately an educational device, the foundation behind the cheap-and-cheerful computer said "a very significant number" of its users were embedding the device into systems and commercial products."We think there needs to be a better way to allow people to get their hands on this great technology in a more flexible form factor, but still keep things at a sensible price," said director of hardware James Adams in a post on the Raspberry Pi blog.To address this, the foundation has unveiled the Raspberry Pi Compute Module, which "contains the guts of a Raspberry Pi" in a new format.

The Compute Module features the same processor and 512MB of RAM as the existing Raspberry Pi, but also has 4GB of built-in flash memory, all on a 67.6mm x 30mm board.That board fits into a standard DDR2 SO-DIMM connector - the same used for laptops, although Adams warns against trying to plug it into a laptop as "the pin assignments aren't even remotely the same".The module is designed to allow users to create their own PCBs, said Adams, but the foundation is also releasing its own Compute Module IO Board "to help designers get started".

  1. http://retrouve3.comunidades.net/
  2. http://yourpot.com/users/dovendosi/blog.aspx
  3. http://dovendosi.gratisblog.biz/

Les commentaires sont fermés.