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25/12/2017

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The proliferation of these gadgets has in turn led to the arrival of applications that are built to use a combination of a wimpy handheld computers and a powerful set of remotely provisioned systems to get the real work done – no PC required.It wasn't that long we would take photos on a dedicated digicam and download to PC and distribute and edit from PC. That was a slow process that used PC resources and was good for the PC, but today we don't do that – people take a picture with their phone and it's immediately on the web, he explained. I think PCs will be affected by those changes and react to the extent that they can.This is a shift chipmakers have noticed as well, with both Intel, ARM, and AMD all recognizing that the middle-ground desktop processors are being squeezed out by a growth in demand for power-sipping mobile processors and heavy-duty server chips.

Many companies have assumed that torrential growth in emerging markets would replace the lost sales from the West, but IDC's data shows the contrary: these developing countries experienced a larger fall in shipments in 2013 than the mature markets, and steeper declines are expected for next year as well. Some of this is because these people are buying phones first, and PCs second, he explained.Tesla Motors has released a smattering of details about its planned battery Gigafactory, although it was hardly the in-depth announcement people were expecting.Elon Musk's electric carmaker said the massive plant would be getting $4bn to $5bn of investment in the next six years, around $2bn of which Tesla itself is expecting to pony up.At least part of that cash will be funded by a bond issue, the firm announced, which it hopes will raise $1.6bn.All of that money will go towards making the Gigafactory produce more lithium ion batteries annually by 2020 than were produced worldwide in 2013, while driving down the cost per kWh of Tesla's battery pack by over 30 per cent.

The Elon Musk-owned firm handed over just five slides on its blog to fill in the blanks on this ambitious vision. According to the slim presentation, Tesla is hoping that its mega-battery-plant will be producing the battery power for up 500,000 vehicles in 2020, which it will be manufacturing from raw materials.One slide was almost entirely taken up with a rather amateur rendering of the factory in an as-yet undecided desert-like location, which the firm said could be Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico or Texas, surrounded by renewable power sources like solar and wind. Musk could potentially get a solar farm on the cheap, since one of his other companies is solar energy outfit SolarCity.The factory wouldn't be expected to start production until 2017 at the earliest, after which battery packs from the plant can go directly to Tesla's vehicle assembly line in California at a rate of 50GWh a year by 2020.If the colour coding of the slides is anything to go on, Tesla has already had its partner discussions, but although the project mentions these $3bn partners, it hasn't named any of them. Panasonic is almost certainly on the list, since it already provides the firm with batteries and it's reportedly been shopping around for investors in the plant in Japan.

There's also the possibility that Apple is planning to join in the Gigafactory fun. According to some maths by eco-friendly motor website Green Car Reports, Apple is likely to have had battery consumption in fiscal 2013 of around 3GWh, based on its reported sales of 71 million iPads and 150 million iPhones and some rounding up for laptop use. Tesla's cars sucked up a little over half that number at 1.75GWh, so as it stands, Apple would probably like batteries on tap at home in the US as much - if not more than - Tesla.Miscreants have forged a variant of the infamous ZeuS banking Trojan that targets enterprise data held by clients of CRM giant Salesforce.com.The ZeuS variant does not exploit a vulnerability in the Salesforce.com platform itself but rather penetrates the insecure devices of corporate workers accessing Salesforce.com. The attackers wait for the user to connect to *.my.salesforce.com in order to extract company data from the user’s Salesforce instance, according to security researchers at cloud-based security outfit Adallom, which discovered the threat.

This is not an exploit of a Salesforce.com vulnerability; this Zeus attack takes advantage of the trust relationship that is legitimately established between the end-user and Salesforce.com once the user has authenticated, Ami Luttwak, co-founder and CTO at Adallom explains in a blog post.The threat was discovered after a single user performed hundreds of Salesforce.com view operations in a short period of time, triggering off alerts at Adallom, a security service provider for the victim's employers. This triggered an investigation. Initially the firm's security team suspected a sales rep was “downloading” their Rolodex by mirroring their Salesforce.com instance to disk. A subsequent investigation revealed a worker's poorly secured and pox-ridden Windows XP home laptop (running an old version of Internet Explorer, and an expired security scanner software) was behind the problem.The Zeus variant on the compromised machine was configured to detect Salesforce.com authenticated sessions (*.my.salesforce.com) instead of banking sites.

The variant was designed to crawl the site and create a real-time copy of the user's Salesforce.com instance. A copy of the temporary folder that was created contained all the information from the company account.While our customer is still investigating the intent behind this attack, it’s easy to imagine how having real time access to a company’s CRM might be useful to its competitors’ sales process, Luttwak explains.Zeus is traditionally used to pilfer online banking credentials and transactions. The latest variant is thought to represent the first time a Zeus variant targeted at harvesting data from enterprise SaaS applications. Although novel the threat the not particularly sophisticated and the tailored SaaS data exfiltration capability is all that really distinguished it from the many banking trojan and other nasties created using ZeuS.ZeuS is most accurately looked at as a crimeware creation that makes it straightforward to create highly customised banking trojans or other nasties, as the CRM malware isolated in the Adallom case illustrates.

Adallom reckons the malware used in this attack was planted like a landline on the compromised Win XP device (a home computer used by the worker involved to catch up with work at night or the weekend) using a phishing attack. Much the same approach could be used to harvest data from any software as a service application.All existing Zeus variants in the wild can be fairly easily re-purposed to steal information from SaaS applications, it’s just a matter of adding another webinject configuration pack, Adallom's Luttwak concludes.We are currently under responsible disclosure with several SaaS vendors for other attacks that have impacted our customers. Some, like the Office 365 'Ice Dagger', are sophisticated. Others, like this 'landline', are not. However, they all target digital assets inside of SaaS applications because that’s where enterprise data is migrating.Adallom's warning is underlined by a case last November involving attempts to use malware against client of ERP giant SAP. Security researchers at ERPScan discovered a variant of the well-known Shiz remote access Trojan (RAT) which searched infected systems for the existence of SAP applications.

HPC blog This is a difficult article to write, and I’ve put it off for way too long. But it’s time to bite the bullet and make an embarrassing admission to the Register audience. I’ve been hacked and hacked hard.Admitting this publicly to Reg readers is like chumming shark-infested waters with my own blood. Or like telling people that I have a lice infection: sure, some will say that being infested with lice doesn’t have anything to do with your personal hygiene, but who believes that?When it comes to computing hygiene, I think I run a fairly tight ship. Every system on our little network is up to date when it comes to operating systems (Windows 7) and applications – including updates and patches.Every system also has a full, and up-to-date, security suite which includes antivirus, anti-malware, anti-spyware, and anti-everything else. Our network is protected by our ISP’s firewall and security infrastructure plus our own name-brand hardware firewall.

I’m also pretty careful about what I download and install on any of these systems. I only download apps that I’ve checked out beforehand, from locations I trust.I got hacked. I first noticed it just after Christmas. My main business system suddenly started playing random audio. It sounded like snippets from radio or TV broadcasts, including short news blurbs, commercials, and bits of music.I figured the problem was something associated with my browsers. I typically have a couple up at any given time, all with multiple open tabs. Sometimes embedded videos, commercials, etc, will play when the sites automatically refresh. Restarting the browsers seemed to do the trick… at first.But it came back. Even after locking down the media options for webpages. Then it started happening even when I didn’t have a browser open – or any applications at all. Oh-oh.I did my routine checks: full system scans (no problems noted), looking at the processes and services that were running (nothing unusual), and paring back programs that started on boot to see if that made a difference.

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